UN Migration Agency Project

Training health providers abroad helps to ensure that US-bound refugees receive proper health screening, arrive safely and have a more successful community integration.

About the UN Migration Agency

The United Nations Migration Agency, known as the International Organization for Migration or IOM, provides care for US-bound refugees prior to their arrival in the United States.

Project Contacts

William Stauffer, Faculty Lead
UMN Medical School, Department of Medicine
stauf005@umn.edu

Erin Mann, Project Coordinator
CGHSR
mann0255@umn.edu

About the project

We partner with the United Nations Migration Agency (IOM) to build the Agency’s capacity to provide care for US-bound refugees. Around the world, IOM physicians, nurses, laboratorians and other healthcare professionals are relied upon to provide high quality and standardized care to US-bound refugees. This project ensures that these health care workers receive the training necessary to equip them to care for the unique needs of displaced patients. Better care improves health, reduces costs for welcoming countries, decreases risk of transmissible infections, and improves refugee integration into local communities.

Key Activities

  • International Trainings: UMN experts deliver clinical training in Asia, Africa and the Middle East focused on physical examination, infectious disease diagnosis and treatment, and best practices for patient communication while working with interpreters.
  • Minnesota-based Trainings and Site Visits: UMN hosts IOM providers and staff to receive training on the US refugee resettlement process. Here they learn about public health and refugee services offered in Minnesota (considered a leader in refugee health) and network with US-based providers.
  • Online Training: UMN provides customized online educational materials for professional development and as “train the trainer” resources.

Project Partners

This project is accomplished through partnerships with Minnesota-based experts and individuals, including UMN faculty, local health providers, the Minnesota Department of Health Refugee and International Health Program, and HealthPartners Center for International Health.

Minnesota-based partners and their international counterparts have a unique opportunity to build professional relationships. This connection between those that prepare refugees for resettlement, and those that receive refugees in their new home-countries leads to an expanded capacity to provide effective care at every step of the refugee resettlement process