Quie & Peterson Global Health Lecture

The annual Quie & Peterson Global Health Lecture honors the work of Dr. Paul G. Quie and Dr. Phillip K. Peterson, striving to continue their legacy of global health leadership and to inspire the next generation of global health leaders.

3rd Annual Quie and Peterson Global Health Lecture

The future is coming!  Are we prepared?  Six mega-trends and their implications for global health in the 21st century

November 18, 2019
4:30 Social Hour - hors d'oeuvres, cash bar, galleries open
5:30 Program and Keynote
Weisman Art Museum

Keynote speaker: Dr Dennis Carroll

Pre-registration is now closed. Walk-in registration will be available.

About Dr. Dennis Carroll

Head shot of Dennis CarrolDr. Dennis Carroll has over 30 years of leadership experience in global health and development.  Until recently he served as the Director of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Emerging Threats Division.  In this position Dr. Carroll was responsible for providing strategic and operational leadership for the Agency's programs addressing new and emerging disease threats.   He provided overall strategic leadership for the Agency’s response to the West Africa Ebola epidemic.

Dr. Carroll was initially detailed to USAID from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a senior public health advisor in 1991.  In 1995 he was named the Agency's Senior Infectious Diseases advisor, responsible for overseeing the Agency's programs in malaria, tuberculosis, antimicrobial resistance, disease surveillance, as well as neglected and emerging infectious diseases.  In this capacity Dr. Carroll was directly involved in the development and introduction of a range of new technologies for disease prevention and control, including: community-based delivery of treatment of onchocerciasis, rapid diagnostics for malaria, new treatment therapies for drug resistant malaria, intermittent therapy for pregnant women and “long-lasting” insecticide treated bednets for prevention of malaria.  He was responsible for the initial design and development of the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI).  Dr. Carroll officially left CDC and joined USAID in 2005 when he assumed responsibility for leading the USAID response to the spread of avian influenza.  Between 2009 - 2019 he oversaw the Agency’s Emerging Threats program spanning more than 30 countries across Africa and Asia.

Dr Carroll has a doctorate in biomedical research with a special focus in tropical infectious diseases from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.  He was a Research Scientist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory where he studied the molecular mechanics of viral infection.

About the Quie & Peterson Global Health Lecture

Drs. Quie and Peterson with the plaques given to them in celebration of the inaugural lecture

Drs. Paul Quie and Phillip Peterson served on the original steering committee that created the Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility, and Dr. Peterson served as our first Director. They also served as founding co-directors of the International Medical Educational and Research program in the Medical School (now GMER) and have an established legacy in the globalization of health issues. As infectious disease research scientists, they have had an impact through their trainees well beyond the borders of the United States.

Dr. Paul Quie, MD

Dr. Quie began his tenure at the University of Minnesota as a resident in 1954 and is Regents’ Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School. During his long career, he was a member of the faculty at the University of Minnesota in the Department of Pediatrics, served as Chief of Staff at the University Hospitals and Clinics, and was the first director of the University’s Biomedical Ethics Center. His research centered on investigation of host defenses against infectious diseases with emphasis on the phagocytic system, and he has pioneered studies on neutrophil function.

Dr. Phil Peterson, MD

Dr. Peterson is Professor Emeritus of Medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School, where he has been a faculty member for over four decades. In addition to teaching, he has served as the director of the Infectious Diseases and International Medicine Division at the University of Minnesota Medical Center and Hennepin County Medical Center. His research has focused on how our immune system defends us against infectious agents, but also gives rise to diseases associated with infections. Currently, he serves as a member of the Coordinating Committee of Health Professionals for a Healthy Climate, a Minnesota-based interprofessional organization that addresses the profound impacts of climate change on human health and the health of our planet.

Support

To support this lecture and the continued legacy of Drs. Quie and Peterson, consider giving to the Paul Quie and Phil Peterson Global Health Fund.

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