RTC

July 25, 2018

In July 2018, students and mentors gathered to recognize the efforts of the first cohort of student teams and launch the second cohort of the Research Training Collaborative (RTC). The RTC is a research training program for students from the University of Minnesota and participating institutions in Uganda to gain hands-on experience in global health research. Cohort 2 was formulated in early summer 2018 and this gathering was an opportunity to present their research plans to faculty mentors and student colleagues. Throughout 2018 and 2019, Cohort 2 will be advancing research projects in three teams.

October 17, 2017

In January 2017, student researchers from Minnesota and Uganda were formed into teams as part of Uganda Research Training Collaborative (URTC). Together, they proposed small-scale research projects and have since been advancing their research plans. The URTC provides a rich opportunity for students from the U of M and partner institutions in Uganda to develop research skills.

For their study, "Effect of adherence and malnutrition on pharmacokinetics and virologic outcomes of atazanavir in HIV-infected adolescents," Team 4 will meet with HIV-positive teenagers and ask interview questions about medication use and nutrition status. The team will also measure drug levels to assess relationships between adherence, nutrition, and drug levels in adolescents.

October 3, 2017

In January 2017, student researchers from both Minnesota and Uganda were formed into teams as part of Uganda Research Training Collaborative (URTC). Together, they proposed small-scale research projects and have since been advancing their research plans. 

On September 20, URTC Team 1 reported the completion of their fieldwork for their project, "A study to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium Bovis in slaughtered cattle in the city abattoirs of Kampala, Uganda". The team of four students hailing from Makerere University’s College of Veterinary medicine, Animal resources, and Biosecurity (COVAB) and the University of Minnesota’s College of Veterinary Medicine screened approximately 1600 animals to collect 316 samples for their study over the course of 15 visits to the city abattoirs (slaughterhouses).